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tv   Anderson Cooper 360  CNN  December 2, 2010 10:00pm-12:00am EST

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>> larry: thank you, mike. >> you're welcome, larry. >> larry: mike tyson. hope you enjoyed this hour. now we're a different kind o show. tomorrow night, our guest is the richest man in the world. carlos slim. he's worth $56 billion. that should be fascinating, and you'll see it right here. thank you for joining us. thank you for joining us. "ac 360" is next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com thanks, larry, and thanks for watching. tonight keeping them honest on don't ask, don't tell. america's top military leaders tell lawmakers why it should be repealed. it was a stunning day of testimony today. they took on tough questions about why, why now, and why their landmark study didn't ask u.s. troops directly if they want to see the rule lifted. you're going to hear both sides in a moment and i'll talk with senator joe lieberman about whether or not he believes his friend, senator john mccain has been moving the goalpost on repeal. also tonight, charlie rangel censured by his own colleagues.
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he says the punishment was political and that he's not corrupt. we're going to show you the wrong doing that moved his fellow lawmakers to vote against him. you can decide for yourself. keeping them honest. and you cannot almost believe that it's happening here. happening today. girls being lured into forced labor. part two of our shocking series, "american slaves, hiding in plain sight." john walsh joins us to talk about that as well. we begin, though, as always, keeping them honest. after a historic day in the fight over ending don't ask don't tell, critics making that change have plenty of concerns about allowing gays and lesbians to openly serve in the military. we spent the week separating fact from physicifiction and cr new concerns when the old ones are addressed. tonight we want to show you how the top leadership today addressed critics point by point in their own words. joint chiefs chairman mullen and defense secretary gates along with authors of the pentagon study on gays in the military
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going before the senate armed services committee. mullen and gates arguing the time for ending don't ask don't tell is now. senator john mccain is obviously the ranking republican on the committee and you'll recall he once said if the military leadership came to him with such a recommendation he said he would consider it. then when they did he said he was waiting for the results of the stoitd. then when the study leaked out he questioned the validity of the study and would be more inclined to take the opinions of the chief because the chairman doesn't command troops. today admiral mullen spoke directly to that criticism and to the senator in particular. >> one final word and with all due respect mr. chairman and senator mccain, if is true that as chairman i am not in charge of troops. but i've commanded three ships, a carrier battle group and two fleets and i was most recently a service chief myself. for more than 40 years i've made decisions that affected and even risked lives of young men and women. you do not have to agree with me
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on this issue, but don't think for one moment that i haven't carefully considered the impact of the advice i give on those who will have to live with the decisions that that advice informs. i would not recommend repeal of this law if i did not believe in my soul that it was the right thing to do for our military, for our nation, and for our collective honor. >> that's one objection answered. senator mccain had earlier downplayed secretary gates' qualifications because the senator said gates had never served in the armed forces. in fact he had and senator mccain had to retract those remarks. the service heads testify tomorrow and it will be interesting to see if the marine corps commandant will change his opinion now that he's had time to study the pentagon report. the study does show higher resistance among the marines and front line forces about serving alongside openly gay troops.
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secretary gates and senator mccain clashed on it sharply. >> i would point out that for in the example with the marine corps, you also have and most of the marines who are in combat are 18 to 24, 25 years old. most of them have never served with women, either. and so they've had a very focused, very limited experience in the military, and it's been a tough one. but i think that with time and adequate preparation we can mitigate their concerns. >> well, i couldn't disagree more. we send these young people into combat, we think they're mature enough to fight and die, i think they're mature enough to make a judgment on who they want to serve with and the impact on their battle effectiveness. >> a second concern of mccain and others, the authors only asked service members about what they thought the effects of ending don't ask don't tell would be, not whether they thought it should be ended. >> i think in effect doing a
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referendum of the service of the members of the armed forces on a policy matter is a very dangerous path. >> do you think the answers to the questions would have been different had we asked them outright? >> well, i think that as mr. johnson and general hamm have testified earlier, through the many questions in the survey, you get a pretty clear view of the views of the force in terms of this change. >> in addition, in his opening statement, admiral mullen pointed to polling done before integrating the military that showed 80% of troops then opposed it and many saying they would leave the service if it happened. today senator saxby chambliss of georgia raised that same concern. by his reading of the pentagon report, more than a quarter million troops might up and leave if don't ask don't tell is lifted.
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>> what if it does happen? what if those 265,000 resign from the military over the next short period of time? what are you going to do? >> if i believe that a quarter of a million people would leave the military immediately, if given the opportunity, i would certainly have second thoughts about this. but i don't believe that. >> secretary gates on the idea of mass depart tours. there's also the question of why now? why war time. should we be tinkering with don't ask don't tell? republican senator collins handled that one. >> admiral mullen, the second objection that we hear over and over and over is that we cannot implement this kind of change in the midst of a war. and i thought you made an excellent point that the opposite may be true, that war time facilitates change in some ways. and in fact, wasn't president truman's 1948 order to integrate
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our forces actually fully implemented during the korean war? >> well, admiral mullen said yes, in fact it was, and far from being a bad time to implement change it was, in his view, ideal. >> we have changed dramatically as a military since 2001. which i would argue puts us in a good position to facilitate additional change. there couldn't be a better time to do it. we are better led at every level than we have ever been led. so leaders can do this. we are able to take advantage of our ability to change and sustain that combat readiness, and i believe making a change like this makes us better. it doesn't make us worse. >> finally there's the question of legislative timing. many senators want to delay a vote on don't ask don't tell
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until the new senate is seated. they say there simply isn't enough time in this session to get it done. senator mccain wants more study and more hearings in part because there wasn't enough time in today's hearing to fully answer all the questions. but what's interesting about that is he chose not to use all the time of the hearings today to focus on don't ask don't tell. look. >> secretary, finally, very deeply concerned about wikileaks. the impact that it has had on identifying people who were cooperating with us in afghanistan and iraq. and some leaders have said they have blood on their hands. >> so we're going to devote more time now to the repeal. i spoke earlier today with senator joe lieberman, independent of connecticut. senator lieberman, based on what you heard today, is there any legitimate reason for keeping this policy in place? >> no. i don't think after today's hearing, after the report put out by the pentagon a couple of days ago, there is no legitimate reason for sustaining the don't
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ask don't tell policy. i mean, i thought admiral mullen and chairman of joint chiefs of staff said something that summed it all up. today, based on the report and survey that was issued by the pentagon a couple of days ago, admiral mullen said it's my professional opinion that we can make this change, which is right, and do it in a way that will not compromise our military effectiveness. >> you've actually called this policy un-american. >> i think it is un-american. the basic american value, to me, enshrined in the declaration of independence is that we're all created equal. that was god's work. and as such we're all endowed with the same rights. at the beginning, those rights were obviously not really given to all americans, and in some ways american history is a journey to realize the basic promise of equal opportunity. and now we've extended it obviously to women and african-americans. in our time i think the front line of the civil rights movement, the human rights
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movement in america and the world is making sure that people don't get discriminated against based on their sexual orientation. >> your very good friend senator john mccain is obviously a staunch opponent of repealing don't ask don't tell. i want to play you something he said back in 2006 on "hardball." >> the day that the leadership of the military comes to me and says, senator, we ought to change the policy, then i think we ought to consider seriously changing it. because those leaders in the military are the ones we give the responsibility to. >> years later, when the leaders in the military, when mullen and gates came out with their opinion, senator mccain started saying, well, we have to wait until the survey is complete. then when word leaked about what the survey was actually saying, he said, well, they didn't ask the right questions in the survey, and then this is what he said today. i want to play this. >> i am simply saying that it may be premature to make such a change at this time and in this manner without further consideration of this report and further study of the issue by congress.
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>> has he been moving the goalpost here? >> well, i -- john is my good friend, but i disagree with him on this. and the tapes you played suggest changing standards here. i mean, in my opinion -- >> so you do think that he's changed his standings, he's moved the goalpost. >> i think the questions he raised has been answered in the survey. two-thirds of the american military, a little more than that, say they don't think repealing don't ask don't tell will have any effect on military readiness, and 92% of the american military who feel that they have served with somebody gay or lesbian in their own unit say that it has simply not been a problem. >> so as his friend, what do you say -- you're not going to give up private conversations, but when you're one-on-one with him, what kind of discussions do you have? how do you try to convince him? >> well, you know, the one-on-one conversations, i mean, i troo to convince him in the same way that i've made the
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case here. but as is evident from today's hearing i'm not making much progress in my arguments. but i think that there are -- i don't think, i know there are more than 60 votes in the u.s. senate to adopt the defense authorization bill, including the repeal of don't ask, don't tell. the only thing that will stop us is it time. and that would be a shame. dr. king, martin luther king once said it's always the right time to do the right thing. and that's exactly the way i feel about repealing don't ask don't tell. it's the right time. >> honestly, though, how much of the opposition -- i'm not talking about from senator mccain, but other folks in congress, how much of the opposition do you think is from folks who maybe just don't like gay people or are just uncomfortable with homosexuality or opposed to it on religious grounds or whatever, because you don't -- you know, while you hear many people who oppose repealing it, you hear them praising service members, you never hear them praising gay and lesbian service members who basically fight and risk their
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lives while at the same time are forced to keep their, you know, a key part of themselves a secret. >> yeah. you know, i don't know the motivations of people who are opposed to this. again, i want to repeat, i thought it was very interesting that if you ask the military personnel who have in fact served with gay and lesbian troops in their unit whether it had any effect, they say no. so that's the greatness of the american military. it's committed to a cause greater than the individual. they're committed to each other. they protect each other. and obviously a soldier in combat will not care what your race, gender, religion, nationality is, or your sexual orientation. they'll care about what kind of soldier you are, and the record is clear that gay and lesbian soldiers have performed bravely and brilliantly in service of our country. you know, in the military, what matters is how you fight. not what you do in your private life.
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admiral mullen talks about integrity. the military still has great values. but this policy, don't ask don't tell, is a stain on the honor and values of the american military and we ought to remove it as quickly as possible. >> just final question, part of the argument used by those who oppose repealing this is that, while sharing bathroom facilities or showering facilities, although frankly most showers in the military are individual, would be -- make people uncomfortable and would also be bad because of possibly predatory, i guess, gay and lesbian service members. do you think that's a valid argument, and -- would you have a problem sharing a locker room facility with somebody who was gay? >> of course not. i mean, look. if any gay soldier begins to sexually harass somebody, a man, they're going to be subject to discipline just like a straight
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soldier sexually harassing a woman will be subject to discipline. so i understand some of these concerns, but, really, there's no reason for them. in any way. and again, the survey is so powerful, which is they've got their own private lives. they're not going to, as one of them said, there's not going to be some outbreak of gayness in the military, that's not what we want. we want to be members of the military, honorable and effective. and our sexual orientation is our private business. and that's the way we're going to keep it. >> senator joe lieberman, appreciate it. >> thank you, anderson. >> let us know what you think about all this. the live chat up and running right now. up next, congressman charlie rangel's punishment by fellow house members and his claim that he doesn't deserve it, that he's not corrupt. we'll give you the facts on what he did, keeping them honest. and the global man hunt for julian asawsange wanted on sex
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so today, charm charles rangeln the well of the house and received the condemnation of his speaker and his colleagues. a man who once ran the committee, that wrote the nation's tax law, censured this afternoon. 333-79. came after the house ethics committee found him guilty on 11 counts. the 20-term new york congressman talked to reporters insisting is he not corrupt. >> i think history would show that a different standard has been used in this case, where i did not curse out the speaker, i have not tried to have sex with minors, i didn't steal any money, i tried to help city college and it's been hard for me to get some of the people in the press to state that out of the 13 charges seven of them are
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related to one event. as i said two years ago, i have not and never and there's not any evidence that i did anything to enrich myself, that i've done anything corrupt, or done anything to sell my office or to sell the congress, anything that involved intent to deceive or to avoid my taxes or any disclosures. >> that was congressman rangel today. no, he did not have sex with minors as some other censured congressmen have, nor did he curse anyone out, but he was found guilty of 11 counts of misconduct. let's talk about the facts. some of the counts were related to his using his office as a powerful congressman to raise money for a school at city university of new york named in his honor. why is that wrong? well, the question is is it really appropriate for a member of congress to be suggesting or even appear to be pressuring
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companies or individuals to donate money to something. in one case according to "the new york times," mr. rangel's committee helped preserve a tax loophole for an oil drilling company that pledged money. even if it wasn't money he himself was after, you can make a case it was influence and he was also censured for accepting several rent stabilized apartments at prices far below market value, apartments designed for residential not office use. mr. rangel denies any wrong doing. those apartments are meant for people with low incomes. if rangel was using those apartments and got them because of who he is, then actually deserving people were not able to use them. then there's the dominican republic. here he is enjoying a moment on the beach. the congressman failing to disclose rental income on this villa as required by congress. he filed amendments only after the ethics committee began investigating him. now the congressman has blamed sloppy bookkeeping and that may be but it may also be an excuse.
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remember, this was the guy writing tax law and he can't seem to keep his records straight, the kind everybody has to, whether we're in congress or not. joining me now, joe johns and melanie sloan, currently executive director for citizens of responsibility and ethics in washington. next year she'll go into private practice with lanny davis. melanie, is congressman rangel corrupt? he says it's not corruption because he wasn't personally benefiting financially but is there an argument to be made? >> i think there is. i think if you ask most americans, they'd think that if you're getting a bunch of apartment that's other people couldn't have access to, that if you're trading on your influence in congress in order to raise money for basically a big monument to me, people would have problems with those kind of things, as well as a tax violations, for example, failing to disclose income, those are things that directly benefited mr. rangel. >> you were at the house today, what was his mood like? >> humiliated, no. contrite, no. apologetic, yes.
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admitting that he did something wrong and needed to be punished, yes, but bottom line was he thought it was too much punishment and the interesting thing was watching the dynamics in the house, he was surrounded by people. there were only two moments i saw when it looked like he was alone and sort of soaking this in and realizing that he was in trouble here. one was when it was clear that they weren't going to bust the charge down and make it a lesser charge. he was alone, looked like he had to take a bunch of deep breaths to sort of regain his composure. and the other time was when the speaker of the house read the censure resolution while he was standing in the well. those were the two moments. otherwise, this was a politician who was just not going to let them see him sweat today. >> melanie, he was talking about the punishment's too severe and part of his point is that others in the past, members of congress, have committed similar violations and were only reprimanded, but in truth there really was no punishment. yes, he was sternly talked to today, i guess, but that's it.
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>> well, that's right. and so to a lot of people that probably wouldn't seem like much, but this is sort of the ultimate humiliation for a member of congress. being censured is the most serious thing that can happen to you short of being expelled and they save that for members of congress convicted of crimes. let's also note he changed his strategy. if you'll remember, for the past two years he's been proclaiming his innocence. he didn't do anything, he was going to have his day and tell us all how he didn't do anything wrong. that didn't work out for him so well. so he's changed his strategy. it's not that i didn't do anything wrong, i wasn't personally corrupt so you still shouldn't issue this hard sanction on me. >> the congressional black caucus was upset, they thought it went too far. maxine waters is also facing ethics charges. how wary are they perceived that they're being extra tough on african-american lawmakers? >> that is a concern because we have these two african-american congress people who are both very high profile. nonetheless, there has been some concern, a greater concern,
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perhaps, that this democratic congress came in talking about a culture of corruption among republicans and weren't able to discipline their own. now with rangel sort of held out as an example, that he did something and he actually was the first member of congress to get censured since 1983, so it will be a little bit easier for them to make the claim that they police their own after these two cases. >> fascinating day. joe johns and melanie sloan. a killer facing the ultimate punishment, he was sentenced today. we'll tell you whether he was sentenced to death or not. and part two of our special report on slavery in america. girls forced to work for years, no pay, no rights, right here in america. we'll show you how and where and we'll talk to john walsh of "america's most wanted" about how to stop it. alcium c t adththod easy-to-swallow petes.
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a lot going on tonight, randi kaye has the bulletin. >> steven hayes was sentenced to death today for a vicious home invasion in connecticut that left a mother and two daughters dead. prosecutors say he and a co-defendant invaded the home,
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raped and strangled the daughter and set the house on fire. the doctor escaped to a neighbor's house. today he said death will be a welcome relief. a person of interest in the shooting murder of ronni chasen has committed suicide.t himself in an apartment building lobby in hollywood as detected tried to talk with him. buffalo is buried in snow, approaching four feet in some areas and falling fast. at last report the snow was falling up to an incredible two to three inches per hour. faster than plows can actually take it away. and take a look at this. could these pictures of bacteria mean there's life on other planets? scientists are excited about the discovery of a form of bacteria that thrives on arsenic. a researcher says that challenges what was known about the elements required to sustain life. very exciting news for the scientists. >> i don't quite understand it,
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frankly, i tried to reach as much as i could today but it's complicated. >> we should be excited, though, because they are. >> i'll take that. all right. randi, as you no doubt heard, qatar was announced today, to host the world cup, a country that only existed since 1971. you may not know much about their soccer team, how long they'll stay in, you might want to book your ticket for the first match because there may not be a second. this is tonight's shot. we found it on youtube, a game between qatar and uzbekistan. a wide open shot, take a look. [speaking in a foreign language] >> i mean -- no one in the goal. >> two of them missed there. looked like.
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>> no one in the goal. boom. ouch. that's got to hurt. let's watch it again. i'm far from an expert on soccer but that looks like the easiest goal ever. i could get that goal, i think. maybe. >> you could. i'm sure you could. i don't think the world cup committee has seen that video. >> at least they have 11 years to work on getting better. >> might not be long enough. coming up, serious stuff, our series, american slaves hiding in plain sight, a report about teenage girls held as slaves for years on end, forced to work in hair and nail salons. and i talk to john walsh about what's being done to stop this crime. also the football player who put his foot in his mouth. [ male announcer ] opportunity
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tonight, the second in our series of reports, american slaves hiding in plain sight. you might think we're exaggerate rating, that we picked that headline, that can't be possible. someone would note, right? the story we're about to show you proves not only is it possible, it may be happening in your neighborhood in front of your very eyes.
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here's amber lyon with our exclusive. >> reporter: these girls were victims of something hard to believe. something you will might never expect. something that happened in plain sight. you're looking at girls who were held as slaves in america, not for a week or a month, but for years. can you tell us about what it was like having someone else control all of your movements, everything you did. >> it was like being, you know, being trapped, you know, being in a cage. >> it's horrible. you know, like sometimes there's not enough food for us to eat. >> no freedom at all. >> reporter: nicole and zena and another 20 girls like them were brought to the u.s. from their homes in the west african nations of ghana and togo nearly a decade ago. barely teens, promised an american education. they were instead enslaved in newark, new jersey. what did the traffickers take
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from you? >> they took my childhood from me, my teenhood, they took it from me. they took my trust from me and they took everything. they took everything away from me. >> reporter: the girls were forced to work in hair braiding salons serving customers all day. right out in the open. their captors took all the money the girls earned. every penny. how many days a week were you working? >> seven days a week. >> reporter: how many hours a day? >> sometimes 14 hours. >> reporter: this went on for five to six years. traffickers held the girls in several houses in newark and east orange. the traffickers no longer live there. this is the neighborhood where these girls were being held, and just look at it. manicured lawns, nice houses, it looks like any neighborhood in america, and it definitely doesn't look like a place where you'd expect to find slavery.
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who would commit such a crime? these are the traffickers. akouavi afolabi was the ring leader. lassissi and dereck the son were accomplices according to court documents and law enforcement. why did they do it? money. pure and simple. they made about $4 million off the girls. paul fishman is the u.s. attorney for new jersey. his office prosecuted the case, rutting in convictions. >> i think it's hard for someone to believe that in the year 2010 we have people who will actually put people in slavery. it's the mst fundamental and intolerable violation of human rights. >> reporter: a newark court recently sentenced akouavi afolabi to 27 years in prison. the father got 24 years and the son? 4 1/2 years. >> after all the promises she promised me, and then when i got here my life was messed up.
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i was too young, if i knew this was how my life was going to be, i would have never come. i would never let her take me. >> reporter: the fact that my clients could be in these hair salons for so many years braiding hair as young as 9, 10, 11, is extremely frustrating. but it's not shocking. human trafficking is extremely profitable. it's so profitable that we're seeing some drug traffickers get out of drug trafficking and into human trafficking. >> reporter: zena took me on a walk where the girls walked every morning to work. from the house to the hair salon down the street. slave girls walking in plain sight of an entire community. >> i always thought of running but i didn't know nobody. i didn't know where to go. >> reporter: finally after five
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years, a tip came to immigration and customs enforcement, or i.c.e. >> these girls were shielded from the outside world, virtually hidden in plain sight. >> reporter: after months of surveillance, i.c.e. agents raided the houses. inside, they found the girls, mattresses on the floor, and filthy conditions. the traffickers had hidden bags of cash and the girls' pass portla ports. something else they found, a notebook used to track the tips the girls received. ironically on the cover of that notebook, a picture of the statue of liberty. after so much pain, the girls, now young women, were free. >> it was a good day. because, you know, it helped my life. i was so happy that i was out from the jail.
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>> all i did was cry. it was -- you know -- it was overwhelming. i told myself she finally, you know, she finally got what she deserved. she did really, really wrong. she treat us bad, and she -- i just -- she was heartless. when i think about it. she was heartless. and i'm happy that she's caught. >> reporter: amber lyon, cnn, newark, new jersey. >> it's incredibly disturbing report, that so many people who could have helped didn't. so the question we have is what's being done to kind of stop this crime on a broader scale. i talked earlier to john walsh, host of "america's most wanted." it's interesting. these young women who were brought over from africa and forced to work in this hair braiding salon, i mean, they were living in a neighborhood, people saw them coming and going, it's almost sort of hiding in plain sight. >> it's all over this country, and i don't think politicians or the criminal justice system has really dealt with it.
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it's the ugly underbelly of america. it's something, save the whales is a good thing, save the polar bears, save the amazon, but this is ugly, ugly stuff. there's three big revenue streams for illegal activity. number one is drugs. we all know that. tied with number two with illegal arms and guns is sex trade. who is the number one country that engages in sex trade and use of illegal workers and keeping them in slavery like those women? america. and we have central americans, we have mexicans -- >> tens of thousands of people are brought -- are trafficked into the united states for this, for slavery. >> for sex, for work, work they don't want to do, work they don't have to do, seven days a week. brutalized, scared to death, threatened with, we'll kill you, we'll kill your family. i think it's the underbelly of this rich, rich country we live in that touts freedom. we are the freest country.
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every time i come back, i say thank god i live in america. but we're also a great country in denial. freedom of sex, freedom of speech, how about freedom of life? of trying to live your life not being exploited and not being used in sex trade or working in a job that you're terrified to tell anybody. >> i guess some people say these women were brought in from africa working in this hair is aen lo, they weren't chained up, they weren't -- they were coming and going, walking to work every day, why didn't they try to escape. i guess the answer to that or one of the answers is, had they tried to escape they were afraid of being deported and being sent back. >> of retribution. the people who membershanipulat people are good at it. look at the mexican people that have been smuggled in here. i've done many cases of mexican pimps and madams telling the girls they'll be maids at the ritz carlton and where are they brought? south florida or southern california or texas and they're
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brutalized by pimps control them and say i'll kill you, you don't tell anybody, or we'll get back into mexico and kill your loved ones. we know exactly where you're from, we got you from your family. >> the trafficker in the case of the africans in the hair salon got 27 years. that's an extraordinarily long sentence for -- it's a rare sentence. >> it's a bellwether. it sends that long message that if you're going to bring people into this country illegally and exploit them you're going to pay for it. and i think law enforcement's ready to saddle up for years, they just don't have the resources. the fbi and the national center for missing and exploited children just partnered up in a nationwide sting and they arrested 900 people that were involved in sex trafficking of little children. of teenagers, girls, 12, 13 years old. they got -- i forget how many kids they got out of that, something like 30 kids they got out of it. they've been wanting to do this for years. they need the mandate, the
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money, the resources, and the politicians to say it's not enough to deport these guys, they're going to come back in six months and operate somewhere else. >> john walsh, thank you so much. >> thank you for covering these cases. you give victims hope. >> still tonight, the man behind wikileaks, a master of hiding himself. the latest in the search for julian assange and the sex crimes charges he's facing. plus an nfl player lands on the rediculist tonight for what he said about troops coming home from overseas. [ female announcer ] fact: the medicine in children's advil® is the #1
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tonight on crime and punishment, where in the world is julian assange, the guy behind wikileaks? he's been in hiding since an int warrant was issued, wanted in sweden on sex crime charges and the one thing he wouldn't seem to leak is his location. tom foreman tonight with the search for assanassange. >> reporter: all over the planet police have been alerted by interpoll, wanted not for the stunning release of all those secret diplomatic documents, but for something else entirely. the australian-born founder of wikileaks stands accused of rape and sexual molestation in sweden. the charges stem from encounters with two women in august. assange's lawyer says it was consensual. assange says he did nothing wrong. >> i'm not going to talk about that. >> reporter: and he bristled when akika schubert asked about it in october.
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>> so you don't want to address whether or not this is an attack on wikileaks? >> it's completely disgusting atika. >> reporter: then he walked out. but he may have a harder time walking away from the international fury over the leaked u.s. government documents. russia, for example, is angry over references in the papers to massive corruption. deep economic problems and detailed breakdowns of prime minister putin's relations with his deputies. putin told larry king in essence the united states should mind its own business. and the u.s. government may now be doing just that. the justice department is looking into what laws may have been broken in obtaining, transporting and publishing all these classified papers. >> well, i encourage -- >> reporter: assange could be charged with possessing stolen meryl up to espionage. according to tom fuentes who
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directed international operations for the fbi and is now a cnn contributor. >> someone accessed classified data bases or basically confidential systems and, therefore, those communications are property of the u.s. government. and someone stole those from the u.s. government and then provided them to wikileaks. >> reporter: a u.s. army private has been charged with an earlier leak of classified video to wikileaks. assange has appeared only once since this latest document release. for an interview with "time" magazine over skype. why skype? experts say it's heavily encrypted and even the best intelligence can't crack it. and asawn nlg is savvy like that. he routinely changes cell phones, his appearance, his location. some are now suggesting they know he is hiding out in or near london. with police and border agents everywhere on the lookout, the net appears to be tightening around him. tom foreman, cnn, washington.
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>> we'll see. ahead, the nfl player upset with the booing from fans. his over the top message gets him sacked on our ridiculous. first randi kaye has the bulletin. two of john edwards former top aides testified to a grand jury looking into payments the campaign made to a vig yog for. in florida police are investigating the first homicide in a disney-developed town. a 58-year-old man was found dead in an apartment in celebration, town built 14 years ago near walt disney world. the defense has rested in the elizabeth smart kidnapping case. prosecutors are expected to take several days to give their rebuttal in the trial of brian mitchell, who is accused of abducting smart from her bedroom back in 2002. and actor chuck norris is perhaps best known for playing walker texas ranger. today the governor of texas gave norris the honorary title of texas ranger. no, i wouldn't mess with the
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70-year-old martial arts expert and i'm sure you wouldn't either. >> all right. time now for the rediculist, our nightly salute to something that's, well, kind of rediculist. tonight we welcome nfl player antrel rolle. it's not the hard knocks on the field that bother him. what really bothers him is when fans booed like they did sunday. two daze later on the radio. he went after them. >> we're out there playing, pouring our heart out for our team as well as our fans. you don't boo your team. i don't care what the situation is, you don't boo the team. >> that's not why he's on the rediculist, it's what he told reporters today that earns him the honor. >> we risk ourselves each and every day. when soldiers come home from iraq, you don't boo them. i take my job seriously. >> yeah. seriously. he really did just compare booing the giants to booing our
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troops, as if football players are equivalent to fighting in war. i know football players are in a very tough profession, but they're not being shot at or blown up by ieds, living in dusty tents eating mres and sacrificing for america. then he signed a $37 million contract with the giants, a private makes a salary between $17,000 and $23,000. now to be fair, rolle later backtracked on his iraq comments calling it inappropriate. >> you cannot compare, remotely compare what we do as they do, their fighting for our freedom and our country. we're playing a game. we get paid a lot of money. i understand that. >> so he stepped back and apologized but he's staying on the rediculist because on top of everything else he blamed his mom. quote, blame my mom, he told the new york daily news. i'm not a politically correct guy. it's my mother's fault.
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if you can't take the heat and you have to blame your mom and you're being paid $37 million, in our playbook for one night, that putts you on the ridiculous. a lot more at the top of the hour. il one day, my daughter showed me a designer handbag. and like that, we had a new side to our business. [ male announcer ] when businesses see an opportunity, the hartford is there. protecting their employees and property and helping them prepare for the future. nice boots. nice bag. [ male announcer ] see how the hartford helps businesses at achievewhatsahead.com.
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tonight keeping them honest on don't ask, don't tell. america's top military leaders tell lawmakers why it should be repealed. it was a stunning day of testimony today.
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they took on tough questions about why, why now, and why their landmark study didn't ask u.s. troops directly if they want to see the rule lifted. you're going to hear both sides in a moment and i'll talk with senator joe lieberman about whether or not he believes his friend, senator john mccain has been moving the goalpost on repeal. also tonight, charlie rangel censured by his own colleagues. he says the punishment was political and that he's not corrupt. we're going to show you the wrongdoing that moved his fellow lawmakers to vote against him. you can decide for yourself. keeping them honest. and you cannot almost believe that it's happening here. happening today. girls being lured into forced labor. part two of our shocking series, "american slaves, hiding in plain sight." john walsh joins us to talk about that as well. we begin, though, as always, keeping them honest. after a historic day in the fight over ending don't ask don't tell, critics making that change have plenty of concerns about allowing gays and lesbians to openly serve in the military. we spent the week separating
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fact from fiction of those concerns and highlighting how it's creating new concerns when the old ones are addressed. tonight we want to show you how the top leadership today addressed critics point by point in their own words. joint chiefs chairman mullen and defense secretary gates along with authors of the pentagon study on gays in the military going before the senate armed services committee. mullen and gates arguing the time for ending don't ask don't tell is now. senator john mccain is obviously the ranking republican on the committee and you'll recall he once said if the military leadership came to him with such a recommendation he would consider it. then when they did he said he was waiting for the results of the study. then when the study leaked out he questioned the validity of the study and would be more inclined to take the opinions of the chief because the chairman doesn't command troops. today admiral mullen spoke directly to that criticism and to the senator in particular. >> one final word and with all due respect mr. chairman and
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senator mccain, it is true that as chairman i am not in charge of troops. but i've commanded three ships, a carrier battle group and two fleets and i was most recently a service chief myself. for more than 40 years i've made decisions that affected and even risked lives of young men and women. you do not have to agree with me on this issue, but don't think for one moment that i haven't carefully considered the impact of the advice i give on those who will have to live with the decisions that that advice informs. i would not recommend repeal of this law if i did not believe in my soul that it was the right thing to do for our military, for our nation, and for our collective honor. >> that's one objection answered. senator mccain had earlier downplayed secretary gates' qualifications because the senator said gates had never served in the armed forces. in fact he had and senator mccain had to retract those remarks. the service heads testify tomorrow and it will be interesting to see if the marine
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corps commandant will change his opposition to lifting don't ask don't tell now that he's had time to study the pentagon report. the study does show higher resistance among the marines and front line forces to serving alongside openly gay troops which brings up the second objection, that they're being overlooked. secretary gates and senator mccain clashed on it sharply. >> i would point out that for in the example with the marine corps, you also have and most of the marines who are in combat are 18 to 24, 25 years old. most of them have never served with women, either. and so they've had a very focused, very limited experience in the military, and it's been a tough one. but i think that with time and adequate preparation we can mitigate their concerns. >> well, i couldn't disagree more. we send these young people into combat, we think they're mature enough to fight and die, i think
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they're mature enough to make a judgment on who they want to serve with and the impact on their battle effectiveness. >> a second concern of mccain and others is that in compiling the report, the authors only asked service members about what they thought the effects of ending don't ask don't tell would be, not whether they thought it should be ended. >> i think in effect doing a referendum of the service of the members of the armed forces on a policy matter is a very dangerous path. >> do you think the answers to the questions would have been different had we asked them outright? >> well, i think that as mr. johnson and general hamm have testified earlier, through the many questions in the survey, you get a pretty clear view of the views of the force in terms of this change. >> in addition, in his opening statement, admiral mullen pointed to polling done before
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president truman integrated the military in 1948 that showed 80% of troops then opposed it and many saying they would leave the service if it happened. today senator saxby chambliss of georgia raised that same concern. by his reading of the pentagon report, more than a quarter million troops might up and leave if don't ask don't tell is lifted. >> what if it does happen? what if those 265,000 resign from the military over the next short period of time? what are you going to do? >> if i believe that a quarter of a million people would leave the military immediately, if given the opportunity, i would certainly have second thoughts about this. but i don't believe that. >> secretary gates on the idea of mass departures. there's also the question of why now? why war time. should we be tinkering with don't ask don't tell? republican senator collins handled that one. >> admiral mullen, the second objection that we hear over and over and over is that we cannot implement this kind of change in
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the midst of a war. and i thought you made an excellent point that the opposite may be true, that war time facilitates change in some ways. and in fact, wasn't president truman's 1948 order to integrate our forces actually fully implemented during the korean war? >> well, admiral mullen said yes, in fact it was, and far from being a bad time to implement change it was, in his view, ideal. >> we have changed dramatically as a military since 2001. which i would argue puts us in a good position to facilitate additional change. there couldn't be a better time to do it. we are better led in my experience at every level than we have ever been led. so leaders can do this.
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we are able to take advantage of our ability to change and sustain that combat readiness, and i believe making a change like this makes us better. it doesn't make us worse. >> finally there's the question of legislative timing. many senators want to delay a vote on don't ask don't tell until the new senate is seated. they say there simply isn't enough time in this session to get it done. senator mccain wants more study and more hearings in part because there wasn't enough time in today's hearing to fully answer all the questions. but what's interesting about that is he chose not to use all the time of the hearings today to focus on don't ask don't tell. look. >> secretary, finally, very deeply concerned about wikileaks. the impact that it has had on identifying people who were cooperating with us in afghanistan and iraq. and some leaders have said they have blood on their hands. >> so we're going to devote more time now to the repeal.
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i spoke earlier today with senator joe lieberman, independent of connecticut. senator lieberman, based on what you heard today, is there any legitimate reason for keeping this policy in place? >> no. i don't think after today's hearing, after the report put out by the pentagon a couple of days ago, there is no legitimate reason for sustaining the don't ask don't tell policy. i mean, i thought admiral mullen and chairman of joint chiefs of staff said something that summed it all up. today, based on the report and survey that was issued by the pentagon a couple of days ago, admiral mullen said it's my professional opinion that we can make this change, which is right, and do it in a way that will not compromise our military effectiveness. >> you've actually called this policy un-american. >> i think it is un-american. the basic american value, to me, enshrined in the declaration of independence is that we're all created equal. that was god's work. and as such we're all endowed with the same rights.
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at the beginning, those rights were obviously not really given to all americans, and in some ways american history is a journey to realize the basic promise of equal opportunity. and now we've extended it obviously to women and african-americans. in our time i think the front line of the civil rights movement, the human rights movement in america and the world is making sure that people don't get discriminated against based on their sexual orientation. >> your very good friend senator john mccain is obviously a staunch opponent of repealing don't ask don't tell. i want to play you something he said back in 2006 on "hardball." >> the day that the leadership of the military comes to me and says, senator, we ought to change the policy, then i think we ought to consider seriously changing it. because those leaders in the military are the ones we give the responsibility to. >> years later, when the leaders in the military, when mullen and gates came out with their opinion, senator mccain started saying, well, we have to wait
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until the survey is complete. then when word leaked about what the survey was actually saying, he said, well, they didn't ask the right questions in the survey, and then this is what he said today. i want to play this. >> i am simply saying that it may be premature to make such a change at this time and in this manner without further consideration of this report and further study of the issue by congress. >> has he been moving the goalpost here? >> well, i -- john is my good friend, but i disagree with him on this. and the tapes you played suggest changing standards here. i mean, in my opinion -- >> so you do think that he's changed his standings, he's moved the goalpost. >> i think the question john raised today has been answered in this survey. two-thirds of the american military, a little more than that, say they don't think repealing don't ask don't tell will have any effect on military effecti effectiveness, and 92% of the
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american military who feel they have served with somebody gay or lesbian in their own unit say that it has simply not been a problem. >> so as his friend, what do you say -- you're not going to give up private conversations, but when you're one-on-one with him, what kind of discussions do you have? how do you try to convince him? >> well, you know, the one-on-one conversations, i mean, i try to convince him in the same way that i've made the case here. but as is evident from today's hearing i'm not making much progress in my arguments. but i think that there are -- i don't think, i know there are more than 60 votes in the u.s. senate to adopt the defense authorization bill, including the repeal of don't ask, don't tell. the only thing that will stop us is it time. and that would be a shame. dr. king, martin luther king once said it's always the right time to do the right thing. and that's exactly the way i feel about repealing don't ask don't tell. it's the right time. >> honestly, though, how much of the opposition -- i'm not talking about from senator mccain, but other folks in congress, how much of the opposition do you think is from
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folks who maybe just don't like gay people or are just uncomfortable with homosexuality or opposed to it on religious grounds or whatever, because you don't -- you know, while you hear many people who oppose repealing it, you hear them praising service members, you never hear them praising gay and lesbian service members who basically fight and risk their lives while at the same time are forced to keep their, you know, a key part of themselves a secret. >> yeah. you know, i don't know the motivations of people who are opposed to this. again, i want to repeat, i thought it was very interesting that if you ask the military personnel who have in fact served with gay and lesbian troops in their unit whether it had any effect, they say no. so that's the greatness of the american military. it's committed to a cause greater than the individual. they're committed to each other. they protect each other. and obviously a soldier in combat will not care what your race, gender, religion,
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nationality is, or your sexual orientation. they'll care about what kind of soldier you are, and the record is clear that gay and lesbian soldiers have performed bravely and brilliantly in service of our country. you know, in the military, what matters is how you fight. not what you do in your private life. admiral mullen talks about integrity. the military still has great values. but this policy, don't ask don't tell, is a stain on the honor and values of the american military and we ought to remove it as quickly as possible. >> just final question, part of the argument used by those who oppose repealing this is that, while sharing bathroom facilities or showering facilities, although frankly most showers in the military are individual, would be -- make people uncomfortable and would also be bad because of possibly predatory, i guess, gay and lesbian service members. do you think that's a valid
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argument, and -- would you have a problem sharing a locker room facility with somebody who was gay? >> of course not. i mean, look. if any gay soldier begins to sexually harass somebody, a man, they're going to be subject to discipline just like a straight soldier sexually harassing a woman will be subject to discipline. so i understand some of these concerns, but, really, there's no reason for them. in any way. and again, the survey is so powerful, which is they've got their own private lives. they're not going to, as one of them said, there's not going to be some outbreak of gayness in the military, that's not what we want. we want to be members of the military, honorable and effective. and our sexual orientation is our private business. and that's the way we're going to keep it. >> senator joe lieberman, appreciate it. >> thank you, anderson.
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take care. >> let us know what you think about all this. the live chat up and running right now. up next, congressman charlie rangel's punishment by fellow house members and his claim that he doesn't deserve it, that he's not corrupt. we'll give you the facts on what he did, keeping them honest. out of the very best america had to offer. ingenuity. integrity. optimism. and a belief that the finest things are the most thoughtfully made -- not the most expensive. today, the american character is no less strong. and chevrolet continues as an expression of the best of it. bringing more technology to more people than ever in our history. inventing new ways to get around our planet while helping to preserve it at the same time. exploring new horizons of design and power. and making our vehicles amongst the safest on earth. this isn't just any car company. this is chevrolet. and the strength of our character can be found in every car and truck we make.
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♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ keeping them honest tonight, a congressman who broke the rules punished by fellow law makers today. he says it's all about politics but a lot of his democratic colleagues disagreed. so today charles rangel stood in the well of the house and received the condemnation of his
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speaker and his colleagues. a man who once ran the committee, that wrote the nation's tax law, censured this afternoon. the vote, bipartisan, 333-79, came after the house ethics committee found him guilty of 11 counts of violating house rules. after a brief statement, the 80-year-old, 20-term new york congressman talked to reporters, insisting he is not corrupt. >> i think history would show that a different standard has been used in this case, where i did not curse out the speaker, i have not tried to have sex with minors, i didn't steal any money, i tried to help city college and it's been hard for me to get some of the people in the press to state that out of the 13 charges seven of them are related to one event.
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as i said two years ago, i have not and never and there's not any evidence that i did anything to enrich myself, that i've done anything corrupt, or done anything to sell my office or to sell the congress, anything that involved intent to deceive or to avoid my taxes or any disclosures. >> that was congressman rangel today. no, he did not have sex with minors as some other censured congressmen have, nor did he curse anyone out, but he was convicted of 11 counts of misconduct by a bipartisan committee. let's talk about the facts. some of the counts were related to his using his office as a powerful congressman to raise money for a school at city university of new york named in his honor. why is that wrong? well, the question is is it really appropriate for a member of congress to be suggesting or even appear to be pressuring companies or individuals to donate money to something. in one case according to "the
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new york times," mr. rangel's committee helped preserve a tax loophole for an oil drilling company that pledged money. even if it wasn't money he himself was after, you can make a case it was influence and he was also censured for accepting several rent stabilized apartments at prices far below market value, apartments designed for residential not office use. mr. rangel denies any wrong doing. let's remember, rent stabilized apartments are meant for people with low incomes. if rangel was using those apartments and got them because of who he is, then actually deserving people were not able to use them. then there's the dominican republic. here he is enjoying a moment on the beach. the congressman failing to disclose rental income on this villa as required by congress. he filed amendments only after the ethics committee began investigating him. now the congressman has blamed sloppy bookkeeping and that may be but it may also be an excuse. remember, this was the guy writing tax law and he can't seem to keep his records
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straight, the kind everybody has to, whether we're in congress or not. joining me now, joe johns and melanie sloan, currently executive director for citizens of responsibility and ethics in washington. next year she'll go into private practice with lanny davis. melanie, is congressman rangel corrupt? he says it's not corruption because he wasn't personally benefiting financially but is there an argument to be made? >> i think there is. i think if you ask most americans, they'd think that if you're getting a bunch of apartments that other people couldn't have access to, that if you're trading on your influence in congress in order to raise money for basically a big monument to me, people would have problems with those kind of things, as well as a tax violations, for example, failing to disclose income, those are things that directly benefited mr. rangel. >> you were at the house today, what was his mood like? >> humiliated, no. contrite, no. apologetic, yes. admitting that he did something wrong and needed to be punished, yes, but bottom line was he
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thought it was too much punishment and the interesting thing was watching the dynamics in the house, he was surrounded by people. there were only two moments i saw when it looked like he was alone and sort of soaking this in and realizing that he was in trouble here. one was when it was clear that they weren't going to bust the charge down and make it a lesser charge. he was alone, looked like he had to take a bunch of deep breaths to sort of regain his composure. and the other time was when the speaker of the house read the censure resolution while he was standing in the well. those were the two moments. otherwise, this was a politician who was just not going to let them see him sweat today. >> melanie, he was talking about the punishment's too severe and part of his point is that others in the past, members of congress, have committed similar violations and were only reprimanded, but in truth there really was no punishment. there's not any punishment. yes, he was sternly talked to today, i guess, but that's it. >> well, that's right. and so to a lot of people that probably wouldn't seem like much, but this is sort of the
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ultimate humiliation for a member of congress. being censured is the most serious thing that can happen to you short of being expelled and they save that for members of congress convicted of crimes. let's also note he changed his strategy. if you'll remember, for the past two years he's been proclaiming his innocence. he didn't do anything, he was going to have his day and tell us all how he didn't do anything wrong. that didn't work out for him so well. so he's changed his strategy. it's not that i didn't do anything wrong, i wasn't personally corrupt so you still shouldn't issue this hard sanction on me. >> the congressional black caucus was upset, they thought it went too far. maxine waters is also facing ethics charges. how wary are they perceived that they're being extra tough on african-american lawmakers? >> that is a concern because we have these two african-american congress people who are both very high profile. nonetheless, there has been some concern, a greater concern, perhaps, that this democratic congress came in talking about a culture of corruption among
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republicans and weren't able to scipline their own. now with rangel sort of held out as an example, that he did something and he actually was the first member of congress to get censured since 1983, so it will be a little bit easier for them to make the claim that they police their own after these two cases. >> fascinating day. joe johns and melanie sloan. up next tonight, a mother and two daughters murdered in the connecticut home invasion, a killer facing the ultimate punishment. he was sentenced today. we'll tell you whether he was sentenced to death or not. and part two of our special report on slavery in america. girls forced to work for years, no pay, no rights, right here in america. we'll show you how and where and we'll talk to john walsh of "america's most wanted" about how to stop it.
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a lot going on tonight, randi kaye has the bulletin. >> steven hayes was sentenced to death today for a vicious home invasion in connecticut that left a mother and two daughters dead. prosecutors say he and a
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co-defendant invaded the home, tied up a doctor, raped and strangled his wife and molested one daughters before tieing them to beds and setting the house on fire. the doctor escaped to a neighbor's house. today hayes said death will be a welcome relief. a person of interest in the shooting murder of ronni chasen has committed suicide. authorities are not releasing his name yet. police say the man shot himself in an apartment building lobby in hollywood as detectives tried to talk with him. buffalo is buried in snow, approaching four feet in some areas and falling fast. at last report the snow was falling up to an incredible two to three inches per hour. faster than plows can actually take it away. and take a look at this. could these pictures of bacteria mean there's life on other planets? scientists are excited about the discovery of a form of bacteria that thrives on arsenic. a researcher says that challenges what was known about the elements required to sustain life.
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very exciting news for the scientists. >> i don't quite understand it, frankly, i tried to read as much as i could about it today, but it's complicated. >> we should be excited, though, because they are. >> i'll take that. all right. randi, as you no doubt heard, qatar was announced today, to host the 2022 world cup, a country that only existed since 1971. you may not know much about their soccer team, they've never qualified but now they're going to get in. how long they'll stay in, you might want to book your ticket for the first match because there may not be a second. this is tonight's shot. we found it on youtube, a game between qatar and uzbekistan. a wide open shot, take a look. [speaking in a foreign language] >> i mean -- no one in the goal. >> two of them missed there.
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looked like. >> there's no one in the goal. boom. ouch. that's got to hurt. let's watch it again. i'm far from an expert on soccer but that looks like the easiest goal ever. i could get that goal, i think. maybe. >> you could. i'm sure you could. i don't think the world cup committee has probably seen that video. >> at least they have 11 years to work on getting better. >> might not be long enough. coming up, serious stuff, our series, american slaves hiding in plain sight, a report about teen girls held as slaves for years on end, forced to work in hair and nail salons here in america. and i talk to john walsh about what's being done to stop this crime. [ j. weissman ] it was 1975. my professor at berkeley asked me if i wanted to change the world. i said "sure." "well, let's grow some algae." and that's what started it. exxonmobil and synthetic genomics have built a new facility to identify the most productive strains of algae. algae are amazing little critters. they secrete oil, which we could turn into biofuels. they also absorb co2.
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tonight, the second in our series of reports, american slaves hiding in plain sight. you might think we picked that title to grab your attention and we're not being literal. you might be thinking how could slaves really be hiding in plain sight today. that can't be possible. someone would notice, right? the story we're about to show you proves not only is it possible, it may be happening in your neighborhood in front of your very eyes. here's amber lyon with our exclusive. >> reporter: these girls were victims of something hard to believe. something you might never expect. something that happened in plain sight. you're looking at girls who were held as slaves in america, not for a week or a month, but for years. can you tell us about what it
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was like having someone else control all of your movements, everything you did. >> it was like being, you know, being trapped, you know, being in a cage. >> it's horrible. you know, like sometimes there's not enough food for us to eat. >> no freedom at all. >> reporter: nicole and zena and another 20 girls like them were brought to the u.s. from their homes in the west african nations of ghana and togo nearly a decade ago. barely teens, promised an american education. they were instead enslaved in newark, new jersey. what did the traffickers take from you? >> they took my childhood from me, my teenhood, they took it from me. they took my trust from me and they took everything. they took everything away from me. >> reporter: the girls were forced to work in hair braiding salons serving customers all day.
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right out in the open. their captors took all the money the girls earned. every penny. how many days a week were you working? >> seven days a week. >> reporter: how many hours a day? >> sometimes 14 hours. >> reporter: this went on for five to six years. traffickers held the girls in several houses in newark and east orange. the traffickers no longer live there. this is the neighborhood where these girls were being held, and just look at it. manicured lawns, nice houses, it looks like any neighborhood in america, and it definitely doesn't look like a place where you'd expect to find slavery. who would commit such a crime? these are the traffickers. akouavi afolabi was the ring leader. lassissi and dereck the son were accomplices according to court documents and law enforcement. why did they do it? money. pure and simple. they made about $4 million off
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the girls. paul fishman is the u.s. attorney for new jersey. his office prosecuted the case, resulting in convictions. >> i think it's hard for someone to believe that in the year 2010 we have people who will actually put people in slavery. it's the most fundamental and intolerable violation of human rights. >> reporter: a newark court recently sentenced akouavi afolabi to 27 years in prison. the father got 24 years and the son? 4 1/2 years. >> after all the promises she promised me, and then when i got here my life was messed up. i was too young, if i knew this was how my life was going to be, i would have never come. i would never let her take me. >> reporter: the fact that my clients could be in these hair
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salons for so many years braiding hair as young as 9, 10, 11, is extremely frustrating. but it's not shocking. human trafficking is extremely profitable. it's so profitable that we're seeing some drug traffickers get out of drug trafficking and into human trafficking. >> reporter: zena took me on a walk where the girls walked every morning to work. from the house to the hair salon down the street. slave girls walking in plain sight of an entire community. >> i always thought of running but i didn't know nobody. i didn't know where to go. >> reporter: finally after five years, a tip came to immigration and customs enforcement, or i.c.e. >> these girls were shielded from the outside world, virtually hidden in plain sight. >> reporter: after months of surveillance, i.c.e. agents raided the houses. inside, they found the girls, mattresses on the floor, and filthy conditions.
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the traffickers had hidden bags of cash and the girls' pass ports. something else they found, a notebook the girls used to track the tips they received in the salon. ironically on the cover of that notebook, a picture of the statue of liberty. after so much pain, the girls, now young women, were free. >> it was a good day. because, you know, it helped my life. i was so happy that i was out from the jail. >> all i did was cry. it was -- you know -- it was overwhelming. i told myself she finally, you know, she finally got what she deserved. she did really, really wrong. she treat us bad, and she -- i just -- she was heartless. when i think about it. she was heartless.
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and i'm happy that she's caught. >> reporter: amber lyon, cnn, newark, new jersey. >> it's incredibly disturbing report, that so many people who could have helped didn't. so the question we have is what's being done to kind of stop this crime on a broader scale. i talked earlier to john walsh, host of "america's most wanted." it's interesting. these young women who were brought over from africa and forced to work in this hair braiding salon, i mean, they were living in a neighborhood, people saw them coming and going, it's almost sort of hiding in plain sight. >> it's all over this country, and i don't think politicians or the criminal justice system has really dealt with it. it's the ugly underbelly of america. it's something, save the whales is a good thing, save the polar bears, save the amazon, but this is ugly, ugly stuff. there's three big revenue streams for illegal activity. number one is drugs. we all know that. tied with number two with illegal arms and guns is sex trade.
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who is the number one country that engages in sex trade and use of illegal workers and keeping them in slavery like those women is america. and we have central americans, we have mexicans -- >> tens of thousands of people are brought -- are trafficked into the united states for this, for slavery. >> for sex, for work, work they don't want to do, work they don't have to do, seven days a week. brutalized, scared to death, threatened with, we'll kill you, we'll kill your family. i think it's the underbelly of this rich, rich country we live in that touts freedom. we are the freest country. every time i come back, i say thank god i live in america. but we're also a great country in denial. we're a country that says, freedom of sex, freedom of speech, how about freedom of life? of trying to live your life not being exploited and not being used in sex trade or working in a job that you're terrified to tell anybody. >> i guess some people say these women were brought in from
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africa working in this hair salon, they weren't chained up, they weren't -- they were coming and going, walking to work every day, why didn't they try to escape. i guess the answer to that or one of the answers is, had they tried to escape they were afraid of being deported and being sent back. >> of retribution. the people who manipulate these people are good at it. they brought them in, they smuggled it in. look at the mexican people that have been smuggled in here. i've done many cases of mexican pimps and madams telling the girls they'll be maids at the ritz-carlton. they're going to be a waitress at an applebee. and where are they brought to? south florida or southern california or texas and they're brutalized by pimps control them and say i'll kill you, you don't tell anybody, or we'll get back into mexico and kill your loved ones. we know exactly where you're from, we got you from your family. >> do you think the law knows how to deal with this? the trafficker in the case of the africans in the hair salon got 27 years. that's an extraordinarily long
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sentence for -- it's a rare sentence. >> it's a bellwether. it's great. it sends that large message that if you're going to bring people into this country illegally and exploit them you're going to pay for it. and i think law enforcement's ready to saddle up for years, they just don't have the resources. the fbi and the national center for missing and exploited children just partnered up in a nationwide sting and they arrested 900 people that were involved in sex trafficking of little children. of teenagers, girls, 12, 13 years old. they got -- i forget how many kids they got out of that, something like 30 kids they got out of it. they've been wanting to do this for years. they need the mandate, the money, the training, the resources, and they need the politicians to say it's not just enough to deport these guys and push they can back over the border, they're going to come back in six months and operate somewhere else. >> john walsh, thank you so much. >> thank you for covering these cases. you give victims hope. up next, john legend, best known of course for his music but also working hard to fix
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america's schools. tonight's "perry's principles" report. thank you for calling usa prime credit. my name is peggy. you have problem? peggy? ok, i've been waiting for fifteen minutes for someone to pick up. you're tenacious like bull. i like. please hold.
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singer john legend has some notes for the education system, he wants to close the so-called
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achievement gap between poor and rich kids. he was home-schooled for several years, went to private school for a while, then when the money got tight went to public school. he's seen it from all sides and says essentially it comes down to this. it's all about who is holding the chalk in the classrooms. here's cnn education contributor steve perry with "perry's principals." >> everyone believes that a kid should get a good education but have you to put your money and your policy where your mouth is. so, you know, when you get down to saying, well not only do i believe every kid deserves a great education, but here's what that means. quality principerhaps, quality teachers, superintendents that are accountable for delivering on their promises. when you talk about accountability, then that means, you know, everybody's not going to be protected in that situation. >> reporter: that's some loaded speech right there, man. >> the priority is to make sure the kids have the opportunity to
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get a great education. and you have to do what have you to do to make that happen. that means shaking up some of the status quo. because clearly the status quo hasn't delivered on that. >> reporter: you said that there are people who benefit from the status quo. you say there are rules that stand in the way. and you say that there needs to be regulatory changes. what does that specifically mean? that's all, well -- >> the fundamental building blocks of making a great school are the personnel, the adult teachers, the principals, the people who are running the school. >> but there are people who would challenge you, john. they would say that those kids come malnourished. >> sure. >> reporter: those kids come lack -- >> absolutely. >> teachers put so much on teachers, they can't do it all. >> it's very clear that it's harder to educate a kid who comes from a really challenging background, background than it is to educate a kid who has
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everything handed to them. so if you're rich, you live in a highly h lly literate house, sp lot of time around literate people with great conversations, your vocabulary, reading scores will be better, you'll be easier to teach. no question about that. but teachers have to deal with the situation as it is, and not just kind of teach in a vacuum in an idealized circumstance where all the kids have the best opportunities. we have to deal with our kids the way we find them. that's not blaming teachers for all that's wrong with education, but it is saying if we're going to get out of this mess we need great teachers. and if you believe that 100% of teachers are great, do you believe that about any other profession? do you believe that 100% are great at what they do? just think about it. if it's your kid, do you want -- you know, do you want that
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teacher that year after year has proven they're not effective at moving kids forward? do you want that for your kid? who gets stuck with those teachers? and we know, the data says, and experience shows that most likely when no one else wants that teacher, when everyone in the district knows that that teacher is not very effective, when no one else wants them, they send them to the poorest kids, to the poorest district. and the kid that's need the best teaching often get the worst. >> now, you've gotten some flak from that. >> of course i've gotten flak from that. >> people are not interested in hearing this singer tell them how -- >> i get flak from that. i'm not an educator and i know that. i say this every time i talk about teachers. i truly respect what they do and i don't envy the task that they have. and like i said we need to hold this job in high esteem. but you just don't put anybody in front of 25 kids. you make sure they're doing what they're supposed to be doing. and if they're not doing it well, then they shouldn't be there.
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you know, the idea that rich kids get to go to good schools and poor kids don't is so entrenched in our national psyche we haven't challenged that notion. we have to challenge that notion. >> now, you are doing that. you are in fact challenging the notion. you've become part of a school. >> yeah. i joined the board of harlem village academies and we not only work with them, but teachers of america, work with the education equality project, we work with other organizations whose mission it is to end this so-called achievement gap, to end the inequality of options for kids depending on whether they're poor or rich or what neighborhood they grow up in. we believe that that's a national tragedy. >> so what the message is you don't have to be a teacher or principal to change the face of education. >> in fact, we need all hands on deck. and one of the things that legend does is he understands
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that just because he is a per foerler doesn't mean he's outside of the conversation. he's a really bright guy with a lot to add to the conversation. anybody who wants to come in and play a role. i'm saying we need everybody. everybody with an opinion and work ethic, let's bring them in. >> that sounds good, steve. thanks. we'll be right back. seven years ago, i had this idea. to make baby food the way moms would. happybaby strives to make the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card
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